Spring 2

Climate change

Students will learn about how climate change is occurring at a much quicker rate in recent years because of human activities. They will build on their understanding of non-renewable energy sources (coal, oil and gas), to learn about the impacts of these on both the environment and people. Students will then learn that these consequences do not affect everywhere equally. Towards the end of the half term, students will then learn about sustainable changes each of us can make to reduce our input on these processes.

How parents can get involved:

  • Ask your child to explain the greenhouse effect
  • Ask your child to tell you the impacts of climate change
  • Ask your child to suggest changes you can make as a family to reduce your carbon footprint.

Spring 1

This half term, students will be investigating the changing global energy mix, learning why some countries lean towards non-renewable sources instead of renewables. Students will assess the impacts of these sources of energy, on the economy, people and the environment. Towards the end of the half term, they will zoom in and focus on a renewable leader.

How parents can get involved:

  • Parents can ask students what the difference is between renewable and non-renewable energy sources
  • Parents can encourage students to research countries which have a high percentage of renewable energy sources and consider why this may be the case

Autumn 2

Food and famine

In this topic, pupils will learn about the physical and human causes of famine and how they impact the development of different people groups. Through the half term they will learn how different countries along the Nile river overcome these challenges.

How parents can get involved:

  • Ask your child about the causes of famine
  • Ask your child to teach you how these challenges can be overcome in HICs and LICs

Autumn 1

River Rivals

In this topic, pupils will learn about the formation of different features of a river and begin to gain an understanding of why rivers are important to both people and the natural environment, focussing on the Nile River basin. Towards the end of the half term pupils will learn about the GERD, and how this contributes to the geopolitical tensions in eastern Africa.

How parents can get involved:

  • Ask your child about the formation of river features in the upper, middle and lower course
  • Ask your child about why the GERD has been built in Ethiopia