Spring 2

In this unit, pupils will discover techniques that cybercriminals use to steal data, disrupt systems, and infiltrate networks. Pupils will start by considering the value their data holds and what organisations might use it for. They will then learn about social engineering and other common cybercrimes, and finally look at methods to protect against these attacks.

How parents can get involved:

  • Ask your child –What does phishing mean? What is ethical hacking? What is social engineering?

Spring 1

This half term pupils will learn about different networks and how they operate. Pupils will be taught about the difference between a LAN and a WAN, network topologies, network hardware and the difference between a Peer-to-Peer network and a Client Server network. In addition to this they will also learn about different protocols used on networks and the internet.

How parents can get involved: Ask your child:

  • What is the difference between the internet and the World Wide Web (WWW)?
  • What does the term “Bandwidth” mean?
  • Which is faster: a wireless or wired connection?

Autumn 2

Physical Computing (With Python)

This unit applies and enhances the pupils’ programming skills in a new engaging context: physical computing, using the BBC micro:bit. In the first half of the unit, pupils will get acquainted with the host of components built into the micro:bit, and write simple programmes that use these components to interact with the physical world.

In the process, they will refresh their Python programming skills and encounter a range of programming patterns that arise frequently in physical computing applications. In the second half, pupils will build a physical computing project.

How parents can get involved:

  • Ask your child how the programs they are creating are implemented into video games, movies and the music industry.
  • Ask your child how computational thinking is linked to a person's day to day activities.

Autumn 1

Advanced Python Programming

In this unit pupils will be creating software programmes using the Python programming language. In doing so a wide range of skills will be taught, including how to create advanced algorithms that utilise conditions, creating advanced flowcharts, using computational logic in combination with Boolean logic, creating robust programs that can be used in wide range of environments and gaining the essential skills that will set pupils on the correct pathway into a future of computing.

How parents can get involved:

  • Ask your child how the programs they are creating are implemented into video games, movies and the music industry.
  • Ask your child how computational thinking is linked to a person's day to day activities.